Zineb Mouline: The Moroccan chemist who conquered Japan

Zineb Mouline is an assistant professor of organic chemistry at Nagoya Institute of Technology in Japan. The young Moroccan prodigy is part of the select coterie of scientists controlling the separation of greenhouse gases.

At 27, Zineb Mouline made the impressive feat of joining the prestigious institute in the land of the Rising Sun, where the latest technological advances abound especially in terms of future technology.

After earning her BA in Experimental Sciences in 2003, the already brilliant student of the School Atlas Group flew to Montpellier. Zineb obtained her master 1 in biomolecular engineering in 2009 and then rallied the Pierre and Marie Curie University (Paris VI) where she pursued in 2010 a master 2 in Molecular Chemistry, Chemistry and Biology.

The "gifted" Mouline didn’t stop at this and went on to obtain a PhD in chemistry and physical chemistry of materials, three years later at the National School of Chemistry of Montpellier. This is also where the Japanese institute appealed to the young doctor to occupy the function of assistant professor in 2013.

"Zineb is excellent and I am convinced that she will very quickly become a well rounded professor" said Yuji Iwamoto, head of the chemistry department of the institute.

A view shared by students of Mouline who believe she’s an excellent teacher. What is more, to bridge the communication gap with her students and peers, she was quick to add the Japanese language to her linguistic baggage that was previously composed of Arabic, French and English. Skills that reinforce the already impressive profile of the young Moroccan.

Zineb is also an active member of the Moroccan Business Club in Japan. One of the missions for which she is responsible is Tadamoun operation which aims to collect funds for the regions affected by the floods.

Her career has earned her the Wissam al moukafaa al wataniya, 4th class, handed by HM King Mohamed VI on the occasion of the feast of the throne./ With Press

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